Black Poets: Mutabaruka

Mutabaruka is a Rastafari dub poet born in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1952. Active since the 1970’s, Mutabaruka, he is also a recording artist whose work is highly metafictive, referencing regularly […]

Black Poets: Gwendolyn Brooks

Gwendolyn Brooks was an African-American poet born in Kansas.Her work evoked the Black experience in the United States and she won aPulitzer Prize in in 1950. She was the State […]

Black Poets: Kofi Anyidoho

Kofi Anyidoho is a Ghanian poet born in 1947 at Wheta in the Volta Region. He hails from a family of Ewe oral poets and is presently a professor at […]

Black Poets: Michael Onsando

Micheal Onsando is a Kenyan jazz writer and poet. He is the co-founder of Brainstorm Kenya. He blogs at www.michael.co.ke  The space of desire is strange What the space of […]

Black Poets: Chris Abani

Chris Abani was born in 1966 at Afikpo in Nigeria. He published his first work, a novel, while just 16. Involved in pro-democracy activism, he was imprisoned twice in the […]

Black Poets: Mahjoub Sharif

Mahjoub Sharif was a Sudanese poet born in 1948. He trained as a teacher and was imprisoned for his poems throughout the ’70s, ’80s and ’90s, his work being critical […]

Black Poets: Atukwei John Okai

Atukwei John Okai was a Ghanian poet and cultural activist. Born in 1941, he taught Russian at the Department of Modern Languages at the University of Legon from 1971 on. […]

Black Poets: Keorapetse Kgositsile

Keorapetse Kgositsile, who wrote under the pen name Bra Willie, was born in Johannesburg, South Africa, in 1938. An influential member of the African National Conference (ANC), he was South […]

Black Poets: Marion Bethel

Marion Bethel, lawyer and poet, was born in the Bahamas in 1953. Her first collection of poems, Guanahani, My Love, was published in 1995 and won the Casa de las […]

Black Poets: Wole Soyinka

Wole Soyinka was born near Abeokuta in 1934. A Nigerian playwright, poet, novelist, and professor, his writing draw heavily on African culture and myth as well as Western literary forms. […]